Thursday, June 29, 2017

7 ESSENTIAL SUMMERTIME AIR CONDITIONING CARE TIPS



Summer's here and it's not going away any time soon. Keeping your air conditioning system in the best shape possible is essential if you want to keep your home cool and comfortable all season long. There's a lot you can do to properly maintain your air conditioner, some of which you can do on your own and others you can with the help of your HVAC contractor.

DON'T BLOCK THE RETURN AIR INTAKE GRILLE


If you have any furniture, drapes or any other obstacles in front of your return air intake grille, you should have them moved out of the way immediately. These obstructions can stifle airflow your air conditioner needs to run efficiently and effectively.

KEEP THE CONDENSER UNIT CLEAR OF VEGETATION AND DEBRIS


Encroaching grasses, shrubbery and other types of vegetation can cover the bottom of the outdoor condenser portion of your air conditioning system, making it harder for the condenser fan to pull air from the bottom of the unit. To prevent airflow problems, you should keep a two- to three-foot radius around the condenser unit clear of any and all vegetation.

CONSIDER UPGRADING TO A SMART THERMOSTAT


A smart thermostat can help you better manage your air conditioning system, bringing you better comfort and improved energy efficiency. Unlike a typical programmable thermostat, smart thermostats are Wi-Fi enabled, allowing you to remotely adjust temperature and fan settings from virtually anywhere using your smartphone, tablet or laptop. You can also receive weather alerts and various online updates when using your smart thermostat.

CHECK AND CLEAR THE CONDENSATE DRAIN


The condensate drain plays an important part when it comes to removing excess moisture. It's not unusual for these drains to end up clogged with debris or algae growth. It's a good idea to occasionally inspect and, if necessary, unclog the condensate drain to avoid water spillage and subsequent leaks.

KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR REFRIGERANT LINES


Another area you'll want to pay attention to is the portion of your split air conditioning system where the refrigerant lines run from the outdoor condenser unit to your home's interior. These lines are usually covered with foam insulation in order to prevent energy losses. Nature can take its toll on this insulation: animals may gnaw away at the insulation for food and bedding while constant rainfall and erosion does the rest.

Use foam insulation tape or foam insulation sleeves with electrical tape to re-cover areas where the original foam insulation is missing. This will help reduce minor energy losses and keep your A/C system operating efficiently.

HAVE A PROFESSIONAL CLEAN THE EVAPORATOR COIL


Time can also take its toll on the evaporator coil, especially if it hasn't been cleaned in a long time. Dust and debris can accumulate on the coil located inside of your air conditioner's air handler unit, eventually preventing air from flowing through the coil fins. Without sufficient airflow, the evaporator coil becomes vulnerable to ice buildup and other HVAC issues.

​Cleaning the evaporator coil can be rather delicate work due to the fragile coil fins, so it's a good idea to have the professionals take care of this important task. Your HVAC contractor will have the right tools as well as the experience needed to clean the coil without causing any damage.

DON'T FORGET TO CHANGE YOUR AIR FILTER


Changing the air filter is one of the simplest things you can do to your air conditioning system. Unfortunately, it's also one of the most commonly forgotten tasks involving A/C upkeep. Forgetting about your air filter can have dire consequences for your A/C unit, as the resulting dust and debris buildup can block airflow, promote overheating and add unnecessary wear and tear on your A/C system.

For more ways you can care for your air conditioning system, you can turn to the professionals at Authorized Heating & Air Conditioning Inc. Don't hesitate to get in touch with us whenever you need heating and air conditioning service in the Greenville area.